Skip to main content

Sphere of Influence

Since starting to run, I have become a Runner's World fan. I rarely get a magazine subscription unless it is a gift, but I subscribe to Runner's World. And I read it, every issue, cover to cover.

In the magazine, there is a regular feature called the Newbie Chronicles. This past month, the author, Marc Parent, wrote a piece called A Mile in His Shoes. It is a cute story about how his 6-year old son asked to come running with him one morning. I loved this story and I highly recommend you read the whole article here. But, the last two paragraphs are really impactful (I have copied the last three below).

We finished together and collapsed on the lawn and slapped hands and howled congratulations. Later that week, Susan got him a trophy—a golden runner atop a wooden base with a brass plate on which was written his name, the date, and the words First Mile. By the end of the month, my two older sons were running at my sides with Susan and Will trailing behind. And it's true what they say, the family that runs together gets super tired together and uses up all the hot water on showers and laundry. In its wrap up of the Christakis/Fowler study,

The New York Times concluded, "If you want to improve the world with your good behavior, math is on your side. For most of us, within three degrees we are connected to more than 1,000 people—all of whom we can theoretically help make healthier, fitter, and happier just by our contagious example.

"No one is an island. No one runs in a vacuum. There is always someone watching you leave the house, dig it out, come back, and do it all over again. You are being watched by a roommate, a brother, a spouse. The driver of every passing car. You are being watched by future generations. My grandmother ran in college! someone might say of you one day. My great uncle took it up in his 30s and ran marathons into his 60s! We are inexorably entwined within each other's influence. You may run by yourself, but no matter how early you start, no matter how remote your location, you never run alone.


Wow. Although this article is about running, and I do hope that somehow by my own, often pathetic, attempts at running, I somehow inspire others to know that they too can do it. But, I share this for another reason. I know we, or at least, I often forget how much my life can be an example to others. The way I live out my faith . . . others see it. The values I stand for and uphold . . . others see it. The way I parent, love and value my children . . . .others see it. The way I love my wonderful husband, speak of him and treat him . . . . others see it. Simply by living a good life, praying, showing up to daily mass, Sunday mass, and standing in line at confession; my life becomes an example to those around me.

I have seen it with my own kids and my running. K, now runs laps around the house yelling "marathon!" K and J often ask to go out for a run with me around the block.

And they see me praying the Liturgy of the Hours in the morning when they come down to breakfast. My boys see me striving to put Jesus first. They see the good and the bad of me. They see me ask for forgiveness from God, my husband and from them. I pray that my example creates a desire in them to "Seek first His Kingdom and His Righteousness." Matt.6:33

" Proclaim the Gospel always, use words when necessary."

So, my friends, go spread the Gospel today. You never know whose life you are touching.

Comments

  1. I love that quote. I'm having one of those "oops. do as I say not as i do" weeks. :) It has been such a rough one for me, so I'm hoping my poor kiddo doesn't learn how to be irrationally angry from his preggo mom.... :) LOVE YOUR HEADER PHOTO.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This was such an inspiring post that I had to read it out loud to my husband. We both loved it! Thank you for sharing this lovely reminder! God bless!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

The Gift (Our NFP story) Part I

(I started writing this post months ago, but have not had time to refine it and finish it.  I have felt the need to hit "publish" lately though.  Maybe it is because Hope is too quickly approaching 12 months old and my desire to share it's sentiments would be lost soon. Or maybe it is because this week is the March for Life and the sacredness of life is before me in a precious little girl and I want to remember that, in words, here.  But whatever the reason, here is our story of seeking God's will and and being open to life.)

Shortlyafter we announced that we wereexpectingbaby Hope, I felt that I needed to share ourNFPstory.  Partially, it was because we had so many people say thingslike, "What a miracle!" or share stories of how people they knew were infertile, adopted and then had a baby of their own, thatI feltthat many people probably got the wrong idea about why we had three boys, waited a while and adopted and then found out we were expecting a baby wh…

The Gift (Our NFP story) Part 2

(You can read  Part 1 here

     So, by the time Andrew was 18 months old, we knew God was saying no to having more children at the time.  And, as mentioned before, He provided so much peace about it, that we knew we had discerned correctly.  Yet, even with that peace, I had to mourn the fact the we might not ever have any more children.  Yes, we were still open to life, of course, but from the time after Andrew’s birth, until today, we practiced NFP faithfully to avoid pregnancy.  And it took time to accept that we might not have any more children.  There were times when I would hold a friend’s new born baby and then go home and cry because I knew I might not ever know the joy of holding my own baby again.  We live in a community where life is celebrated and families are large.  Usually more than one friend is pregnant at a time.  In those early days, each pregnancy announcement was met with great joy for the friend, but often left me with an empty feeling.  I understood, in many way…

Hope's Birth Story

When it comes to birth stories, most women do not write up, nor do I think they want to read about, scheduled c-sections. But, I want to remember the day and if I do not write it here to publish, it is unlikely that I will sit down for my own sake, and write, so bear with me as I recount the day.

As with most scheduled, repeat c-sections, the date was scheduled months in advanced.  I knew that Hope would arrive on May 3 unless she decided to surprise us and my body would decide to go into labor for the first time ever.  Although I am older and anything is possible, I thought it highly unlikely, so I was not too worried that she would be born any sooner that May 3rd.

The hospital that I deliver at has started something called the "Family Centered C-Section."  If you are having a scheduled, routine, c-section, you can elect to have a family centered c-section.  Basically, they allow you to have some of the experiences that you miss in a c-section that you have in a natural birt…